The History of East Asia as Newly Recognized from the Perspective of Korean Historians

Miyazima Hiroshi and Bae Hang-seob, eds. Tong Asia nŭn myŏt si inga?Tong Asia-sa ŭi saeroun ihae rŭl ch’ajasŏ 동아시아는 몇 시인가?: 동아시아사의 새로운 이해를 찾아서 [What time is East Asia? In search of a new understanding of East Asian history]. Seoul: Nŏmŏ puksŭ, 2015. ISBN: 9788994606392.

The Eurocentrism and modern-centrism that have established themselves as the predominant discourses of historians may need to be further pushed aside by new discourses. Sinocentrism, decentralism, multiple modernities, alternative modernity—these are just a few of the candidates. No one knows what the dominant discourse is going to be down the road. Fourteen authors, including editors Miyazima Hiroshi and Bae Hang-seob, contributed to the collection What Time Is East Asia? In Search of a New Understanding of East Asian History in 2015. This book presents a new historical discourse that emerged in Korea as a critique of Eurocentrism and modern-centrism. The title refers to a question posed by Alexander Woodside in his 2006 book, Lost Modernities, and is meant to suggest that the historical experience of East Asia cannot be grasped by historical perspectives based on Eurocentrism...

The History of East Asia as Newly Recognized from the Perspective of Korean Historians

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