A Japanese Perspective on Late Nineteenth-Century Korean Reform Movements


In his most recent book, which focuses on post-Kanghwa Treaty (1876) Korea, Watanabe Sōki (2014), the prolific scholar of Japanese-American relations, addresses an important question: why did the United States eventually come to support Japan’s decision to annex the Korean peninsula? He argues that this decision represented a departure from a position the two countries had traditionally held: supporting an independent Korea (199). The ramifications of this shift are important in Korea’s pre-annexation history, but also in its post-liberation history, when again the United States showed a greater affinity toward Japan than toward southern Korea...

A Japanese Perspective on Late Nineteenth-Century Korean Reform Movements

Watanabe Sōki. Chōsen kaikoku to nisshin sensō: Amerika wa naze Nihon wo Shijishi, Chōsen wo mikagittaka [The opening of Korea and the Sino-Japanese War: Why did the United States support Japan but abandon Korea?]. Tokyo: Sōshisha, 2014. ISBN: 978-4-7942-2098-1.

 

 

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